Author: start

Disclaimer

START Journal of Arts and Culture is a product of Kampala Arts Trust (KART). Terms of use. All articles on the START website are provided to you free of charge. The information we present is for your own interest and

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About Start

”START – A Journal of Arts and Culture” is a Kampala-based online journal covering visual arts, performing arts, literature, music and other creative possibilities on the African continent.  Start has been published four times as a printed magazine between 2007

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Art Venues

Where to go for Art in Uganda? Afriart Gallery (www.afriartgallery.org) “Afriart Gallery is a focal point of Kampala’s artistic community and provides a wonderful space to showcase the exquisite art of Uganda. The gallery shows the best of African fine art.

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Issue No 004 Dec ´09

The last quarter of the year was an exciting one for the Ugandan art world. It saw the arrival of the Dutch Masters Today exhibition at the Uganda Museum, which was unique not just because it enabled three prominent Ugandan artists—our own Daudi Karungi and Henry Mzili Mujunga among them—to exhibit alongside Dutch masters, but because our national museum actually hosted a modern art exhibition. Mzili talks to its curator, Ugandan expatriate David Oduki, and gets his ideas on one of our central preoccupations—how to get Africans to buy African art. In the performing arts arena, Tebandeke Samuel Lutaaya reflects on the history and development of modern dance in Uganda. We go beyond the purview of fine art to look at the aesthetics of branding with Michiel van Oosterhout’s piece comparing the marketing tactics of Uganda’s ever-growing stable of telecom companies. Finally, Dutch photographer Andrea Stultiens weighs in from the Netherlands in Notes from Abroad, we provide a primer for pricing artwork—and more.

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Issue No 003 Jul ´09

In this issue, we offer several contrasting perspectives on this controversial show of lecturers’ work. Elsewhere, correspondent Henry Mzili Mujunga returns with a reflection on the contentious issue of nudity in the arts and local urban culture. Mzili also profiles successful Ugandan photographer Eric Rwakoma, one of those rare and envied members of our artist community who manages to make his living doing what he does best. On the international scene, Leah Sandals provides us with a primer on how to break into the exciting and lucrative Canadian art scene. Read on for more features on the latest trends and techniques in the Ugandan art world.

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Issue No 002 Feb ´08

In the second issue, we explore the vital—and sometimes uneasy relationship between the arts and the commercial world. Artist and writer Henry Mzili Mujunga returns as our chief correspondent, exploring the recent rash of “biennales” and other art festivals in Africa and around the globe that have, in a desperate search for approval from the arts establishment, looked suspiciously similar. Mzili also profiles Segah, the rising Ugandan sculptor with a refreshing work ethic and takes us behind the scenes for the making of The Stride, the sculpture commissioned for last year’s CHOGM extravaganza. Anne- Liese Prem looks at the trend on the international art scene of works fetching staggering sums and the struggle to bring funding to our local arts scene. And finally, Catherine Meyer writes about how the arts in Uganda are giving something back to communities.

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Issue No 001 Oct ´07

In this first issue, founders Daudi Karungi and Henry Mzili Mujunga talk about the success of the recent “pothole art” produced during La Ba “street art” festival in Kampala and the role of public art as a way to promote the visual arts in African cities and make art more accessible to local residents. We talk with Maria Naita, perhaps Kampala’s premier sculptress; Mzili reflects on the identity politics of being an artist in Africa today and Dean George Kyeyune gives us the history of Makerere’s Margaret Trowell School of Industrial and Fine Art — one of the most venerable art schools on the continent. We also pay a visit to the Mona Studio in Kamwokya, where local artists are pioneering a new kind of inner city art studio.

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